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<page>
	<node0>
		<logo>internship</logo>
		<title>Getty Conservation Institute</title>
		<location>Conservation Internship</location>
		<image>mapimages/debrer.jpg</image>
		<body>From 2007-2008, Christian DeBrer worked at the <a href="http://www.getty.edu/conservation/"><u>Getty Conservation Institute's</u></a>   Field Projects section on the conservation and management of Tunisian mosaics. This internship provided him the opportunity to work with artifacts as well as participate in the ongoing training of local technicians in Tunisia on the conservation of in situ mosaics.
		</body>
		<links><u></u></links>
	</node0>
	<node1>
		<logo>internship</logo>
		<title>Southwest Museum of the American Indian</title>
		<location>Conservation Internship</location>
		<image>mapimages/gencay-ustun.jpg</image>
		<body>From 2007 to 2008, Özge Gençay-Üstün interned at the <a href="http://www.autry-museum.org/"><u>Southwest Museum of the American Indian, Autry National Center</u></a>, where she worked on a large-scale collections move as well as on exhibitions and loans.
		</body>
		<links><u></u></links>
	</node1>
	<node2>
		<logo>internship</logo>
		<title>Smithsonian's National Museum<br/>of Natural History</title>
		<location>Conservation Internship</location>
		<image>mapimages/gleeson.jpg</image>
		<body>From 2007 to 2008, Molly Gleeson interned in the <a href="http://anthropology.si.edu/conservation/index.htm"><u>Anthropology Conservation Laboratory at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History</u></a> . In this position, her work focused on a special loan of NMNH Native Alaskan collections to the Anchorage Museum and Arctic Studies Center.
		</body>
		<links><u></u></links>
	</node2>
	<node3>
		<logo>internship</logo>
		<title>University of Pennsylvania Museum<br/>of Archaeology and Anthropology</title>
		<location>Conservation Internship</location>
		<image>mapimages/lewis.jpg</image>
		<body>From 2007 to 2008, Allison Lewis interned at the <a href="http://www.museum.upenn.edu/index.php"><u>University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology</u></a>. She worked on archaeological and ethnographic objects from a number of different cultures and periods.
		</body>
		<links><u></u></links>
	</node3>
	<node4>
		<logo>internship</logo>
		<title>U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum</title>
		<location>Conservation Internship</location>
		<image>mapimages/pickman.jpg</image>
		<body>From 2007 to 2008, Steven Pickman worked as the <a href="http://www.ushmm.org/museum/volunteer_intern/intern/"><u>Neukom Family Foundation Intern</u></a> at the <a href="http://www.ushmm.org/"><u>U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum</u></a> in Washington D.C. where he worked on historic collections.
		</body>
		<links><u></u></links>
	</node4>
	<node5>
		<logo>internship</logo>
		<title>Getty Conservation Institute</title>
		<location>Conservation Internship</location>
		<image>mapimages/werden.jpg</image>
		<body>From 2007 to 2008, Liz Werden interned at the <a href="http://www.getty.edu/conservation/"><u>Getty Conservation Institute's</u></a>   Field Projects section, focusing on establishing protocols for the documentation of rock art sites, the training of conservators in these techniques, and overall site conservation. 
		</body>
		<links><u></u></links>
	</node5>
	
	
	<node6>	
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Dvin Archaeological Project</title>
		<location>Yerevan, Armenia </location>
		<image>mapimages/dvin.jpg</image>
		<body>As one of the cities that has played a crucially important role in the relations between Byzantium and Iran (fourth - seventh centuries AD), Dvin presents us with a unique opportunity to develop an archaeology of sociopolitical dynamics in the borderland between the super powers of Late Antiquity. An historical archaeological study of Dvin may become a major contribution to the study of collective identities during the periods from Late Antiquity through the High Middle Ages. As the capital city of Armenia for 500 years (from the end of the fifth through the end of the ninth centuries AD) Dvin and its population had been at the center of the processes of transformation of the Armenian national identity, the formation of which began no later than the first half of the third century AD.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/research-associates/areshian"><u>Gregory Areshian</u></a>, Visiting Professor of Near Eastern and Eurasian Archaeology, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology; Aram A. Kalantarian, Professor of Archaeology, Yerevan State University, and Advisor to the Director, Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia
		</body>
		<links><u></u></links>
	</node6>
	<node7>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Santa Cruz Island Archaeological Project</title>
		<location>Santa Cruz Island, California</location>
		<image>mapimages/santacruz.jpg</image>
		<body>Jeanne Arnold is well known for her work on the archaeology of the Island Chumash of California. She has researched and published extensively on the later prehistory and early colonial period of the American Pacific Coast, focusing on Native American community and household organization, specialized labor and occupations, and the emergence of hierarchical socioeconomic and political relationships. Ongoing work on the Channel Islands centers on evidence for the invention of Chumash plank canoe, craft production systems and political economy on the northern Channel Islands, and the role of property ownership in the emergence of political leadership. Using a variety of survey, surface collection, excavation, and remote sensing strategies, Arnold and her graduate students have analyzed communities on the northern Channel Islands to provide a window onto daily household life, specialized craft production, exchange relationships, subsistence, and political evolution. Analyses are ongoing.<br/><br/>Director: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/arnold"><u>Jeanne Arnold</u></a>, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the <a href="http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/anthro/faculty/arnold/california-lab.htm"><u>Channel Islands Laboratory</u></a> , Cotsen Institute
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node7>
	<node8>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Ethnoarchaeological Research: <br/>Modern Material Culture</title>
		<location>Los Angeles, California</location>
		<image>mapimages/ethnoarch.jpg</image>
		<body>The ethnoarchaeology domain of the <a href="http://www.celf.ucla.edu/"><u>CELF</u></a> project focuses on the material culture of middle-class family lives, including the physical house and grounds, the possessions of the family, and the diverse challenges inherent in maintaining a house and overall family well-being at home for busy working parents. This theme, or set of research goals, is collectively labeled "The Centrality of Home: Material Culture and the Place of the Home in Middle-Class Family Lives." The CELF databases allow rapid access to rich spatial and temporal records of working family life, providing for an array of qualitative and small-scale quantitative analyses about activities, objects, and time use in the home. Jeanne Arnold's current CELF projects focus on the middle-class storage and clutter crisis, the vanishing leisure of dual-earner parents, and family identity embodied in the home and its artifacts.<br/><br/>Director: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/arnold"><u>Jeanne Arnold</u></a>, Professor of Anthropology and core faculty member of the <a href="http://www.celf.ucla.edu/"><u>Center on Everyday Lives of Families (CELF)</u></a> 
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node8>
	<node9>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>The Fraser River Valley Archaeological Project </title>
		<location>British Columbia, Canada</location>
		<image>mapimages/fraser_river.jpg</image>
		<body>Jeanne Arnold was one of several co-directors for the fieldwork stages of the <a href="http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/ioa/staff/arnold/fraser.htm"><u>Fraser River Valley Archaeological Project</u></a> in British Columbia, Canada, which started in 2002. Fieldwork was largely concluded in 2006, and analyses and publication projects are now ongoing. Working with colleagues from Simon Fraser University (SFU), University of British Columbia, and the Sto:lo Nation (Coast Salish), UCLA team members focused on early village sites and late precontact and early colonial-era households in the Sto:lo (Coast Salish) region and their social and exchange relationships with other groups situated along the massive Fraser River system. The research team has focused on particular sites/communities in order to maximize the benefits from this project for promoting Sto:lo cultural heritage. Sto:lo cultural leader Sonny McHalsie and Sto:lo archaeologist Dave Schaepe spoke at UCLA's public lecture series in 2006.<br/><br/>Directors & Collaborators: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/arnold"><u>Jeanne Arnold</u></a>, Professor of Anthropology; Dana Lepofsky (Simon Fraser University); Mike Blake (University of British Columbia); David Schaepe (Sto:lo Nation and UBC), et al.
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node9>
	<node10>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Tibet Paleolithic Project </title>
		<location>Qinghai Lake, China </location>
		<image>mapimages/tibet.jpg</image>
		<body>The Tibetan Plateau is a unique high-elevation environment occupying a substantial portion of the Asian continent. Archaeological evidence from various locations on the Plateau suggests that hunter-gatherer groups first colonized the area during the late Pleistocene. Radiocarbon dates of 13-11,000 years BP have been obtained from two different archaeological localities both above 3000m asl, and geological correlations at several other sites suggest that the earliest hunter-gatherer occupations of the  <a href="http://paleo.sscnet.ucla.edu/"><u>Qinghai-Tibet Plateau</u></a>  may date to 25-23,000 years BP. What evolutionary and ecological processes led hunter-gatherer populations to occupy these extreme environments? And, what behavioral strategies facilitated successful colonization? The answers to these questions will provide important insights into the fundamental features of human behavioral adaptations and hold implications for explaining major biogeographic events in human evolutionary history such as the colonization of the Americas.<br/><br/>Director: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/brantingham"><u>P. Jeffrey Brantingham</u></a>, Assistant Professor and Vice-Chair of Anthropology  
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node10>
	<node11>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Urkesh Project </title>
		<location>Qamishli, Syria </location>
		<image>mapimages/urkesh.jpg</image>
		<body>Tell Mozan is the site of the ancient city of Urkesh, which has been under excavation since 1984 under the direction of Giorgio Buccellati and Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati and various European archaeological institutes. Its beginnings are as yet unknown, but they likely date back to the earliest times of urban life, around 3000 BC. It was a main center of the Hurrians, who celebrated it in their myths as the place where the father of the gods (Kumarbi) lived, but it was also the capital of a kingdom that controlled the highlands immediately to the north. The archaeological data from each field season has been systematically stored in an <a href="http://www.urkesh.org/"><u>online database</u></a> that the directors have plans to publish digitally. The system—the Urkesh Global Record—provides online access to the totality of the observations made in the field. Excavations and analyses are ongoing. <br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/buccellati"><u>Giorgio Buccellati</u></a>, Professor Emeritus of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures; Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati, California State University, Los Angeles and Research Associate of the Cotsen Institute
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node11>
	<node12>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Jaffa Cultural Heritage Project (JCHP)</title>
		<location>Jaffa, Israel</location>
		<image>mapimages/jaffa.jpg</image>
		<body>The <a href="http://www.nelc.ucla.edu/jaffa/"><u>JCHP</u></a> is an interdisciplinary cultural heritage project that addresses the history and archaeology of Jaffa. Yafo, ancient Jaffa (Gk. Joppa; Ar. Yafa), is situated south of the modern city of Tel Aviv on the coast of Israel between Caesarea and Gaza, about 60 km northwest of Jerusalem. The site consists of an ancient tell built on a kurkar sandstone ridge overlooking the Mediterranean Sea and during various periods also included a sprawling lower city. As a major tell and port along the coast of the southern Levant its occupation reflects most periods from the Middle Bronze Age through the present. The activities of the JCHP consist of four overarching initiatives: research (excavations), publication, conservation, and outreach. Additionally, the JCHP serves as a coordinating body for researchers who share an interest in revealing, researching, preserving, and presenting Jaffa's cultural heritage.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/burke"><u>Aaron Burke</u></a> , Assistant Professor of Ancient Israel & the Levant in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures; Martin Peilstöcker, Israel Antiquities Authority
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node12>
	<node13>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Kahramanmaras Archaeological Project</title>
		<location>Turkey</location>
		<image>mapimages/kahramanmaras.jpg</image>
		<body>The Kahramanmaras Archaeological Project, co-sponsored by the University of Manchester, aims to produce a record of long-term cultural changes in a region at a major crossroads between highlands and lowlands along the Syro-Anatolian frontier. Starting in 1993, the investigations have included both a regional survey covering 1,100 survey kilometers and excavations at <a href="http://www.opencontext.org/database/project.php?item=3"><u>Domuztepe</u></a> , the site of a large prehistoric settlement from the Halaf Period (6th millennium BC). Among the features of the site is large mass burial dated to circa 5600 BC. Studies of the human bone fragments here demonstrate extensive corpse processing, preceded by catastrophic death and possibly followed by consumption of human flesh before deposition of the extensively fragmented remains into a pit burial. At present it seems that this deposit, the "death pit", marked a late stage in a complex funerary ritual. Excavations are ongoing. <br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/carter"><u>Elizabeth Carter</u></a>, Professor & Chair of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures; Stuart Campbell, University of Manchester
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node13>
	<node14>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>The Mosfell Archaeological Project</title>
		<location>SW Iceland </location>
		<image>mapimages/mosfell.jpg</image>
		<body><a href="http://www.viking.ucla.edu/"><u>The Mosfell Archaeological Project</u></a> is an interdisciplinary research project employing the tools of history, archaeology, anthropology, forensics, environmental sciences, and saga studies. The work is constructing a picture of human habitation and environmental change in Mosfell, Iceland. The Mosfell Valley (Mosfellsdalur), the surrounding highlands, and the lowland coastal areas are a valley system: an interlocking series of natural and man-made pieces that beginning in the ninth-century settlement (landnám period) developed into a functioning Viking Age, Icelandic community. Focusing on this valley system, our task is to unearth the prehistory and early history of the Mosfell region. We seek the data to provide an in-depth understanding of how this countryside (sveit) evolved from its earliest origins. The Mosfell Archaeological Project has implications for the larger study of Viking Age and later medieval Iceland, as well as for the north Atlantic world.<br/><br/>Director: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/byock"><u>Jesse Byock</u></a>, Professor of Old Norse and Medieval Scandinavia, Scandinavian Section; Co-director: <a href="http://www.anth.ucsb.edu/faculty/walker/Iceland/mosfell.html"><u>Phillip Walker</u></a>, Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara
		</body>
		<links><b>Links:</b><br/><a href="http://www.cmrs.ucla.edu/projects/mosfell_dig.html"><u>Mosfell Archaeological Project: A Viking Landscape Video</u></a><br/><a href="http://www.gagarin.is/_verk/moso/main_content.html"><u>Icelandic project page, click "Áfram"</u></a></links>
	</node14>
	<node15>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Moche Archaeology</title>
		<location>North Coast, Peru </location>
		<image>mapimages/moche.jpg</image>
		<body>Christopher Donnan has dedicated his 40-year career to the study of the Moche culture through archaeological fieldwork, collections research, and thousands of hours of material analysis. Donnan has spent many years directing field projects at such well-known sites as Chan Chan, Chotuna-Chornancap, Pacatnamú, Sipán, San José de Moro, and Dos Cabezas. While he has focused primarily on iconography and the rich history of pottery production the Andes, he has also published on stone tools, murals, numbering systems, metallurgy, architecture, burial traditions, and many other elements of Andean prehistory. He recently published two books with the Cotsen Institute on his long-term research projects — <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/publications/browse-books/monographs/mo58"><u><i>Moche Fineline Painting from San José de Moro</i></u></a> and <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/publications/browse-books/monographs/mo59"><u><i>Moche Tombs at Dos Cabezas</i></u></a> — and is completing a book on the excavation of Chotuna, a north coast site that corresponds to an ancient Peruvian legend. <br/><br/><a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/donnan"><u>Christopher B. Donnan</u></a>, Professor of Anthropology and Director Emeritus, The Fowler Museum of Cultural History
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node15>
	<node16>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Greek-Parthian-Roman Archaeology</title>
		<location>Syria</location>
		<image>mapimages/greek.jpg</image>
		<body>Susan Downey has taught Art History at UCLA since 1965 and has actively participated in both the Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Archaeology (Chair, 1996-2001) and the Cotsen Institute. Since 1988, she has been a member of the Mission Franco-Syrienne de Dura-Europos (Syria) and continues to instruct, publish and lecture on the results of this multi-year project, with particular focus on her excavations in the Temple of Zeus Megistos. Professor Downey's <a href="http://www.humnet.ucla.edu/humnet/arthist/faculty/downeyRecent.pdf"><u>major publications</u></a> include two volumes on the sculpture of Dura-Europos, <i>Mesopotamian Religious Architecture: Alexander through the Parthians</i> (1988), <i>Architectural Terracottas from the Regia</i> (1996), and most recently, <i>Terracotta Figurines and Plaques from Dura-Europos</i> (2003). She also regularly teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Greek and Roman art and archaeology and travels for public and university lectures on her research in Syria and Iraq.<br/><br/><a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/downey"><u>Susan B. Downey</u></a>, Professor of Art History
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node16>
	<node17>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Scaloria Cave Project</title>
		<location>Manfredonia, SE Italy </location>
		<image>mapimages/scaloria.jpg</image>
		<body>Scaloria, a double-chambered cave located in southeastern Italy, was first discovered unexpectedly in the 1930’s, excavated partially in the 1960’s, and excavated most recently by a UCLA-University of Genoa team from 1978-80. The Scaloria Cave Project, co-directed by Ernestine Elster and Professor Santo Tiné, is an interdisciplinary collaborative effort focused on the analysis and interpretation of unpublished data from these various projects. Presently, the details of Scaloria are preserved only in the regional museum storerooms and in the minds and notebooks of those who participated in the 1978-80 excavations. The goal of this project, which has received generous support from the Cotsen Institute and the National Endowment for the Humanities (Collaborative Research Grant, 2008-2010), is to work with colleagues in Italy, the US, the UK and Hungary to publish a final excavation monograph on the investigations of this important Neolithic site. <br/><br/><a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/research-associates/elster"><u>Ernestine S. Elster</u></a>, Research Associate of the Cotsen Institute
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node17>
	<node18>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>The Origins of Social Inequality<br/>in Early Formative Mesoamerica</title>
		<location>Chiapas, Mexico </location>
		<image>mapimages/lesure1.jpg</image>
		<body>Richard Lesure is a specialist in Mesoamerican archaeology whose research interests center on the archaeology of sedentary societies prior to the rise of states and civilizations. Much of his work is inspired by classic problems in the archaeology of complex societies, including the origins of sedentism, the roots of social inequality, and the development of urban life.  He has conducted archaeological excavations at Formative-era sites on the coast of Chiapas, Mexico, and in the highland Mexican state of Tlaxcala. In addition to his work at the large village site of Paso de la Amada in Coastal Chiapas, he has most recently focused his attention on the site of El Varal, a special-purpose estuary site in the Soconusco region, to explore the origins of agriculture and sedentary life in ancient Mesoamerica.<br/><br/><a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/lesure"><u>Richard Lesure</u></a> , Associate Professor of Anthropology
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node18>
	<node19>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>African Archaeology</title>
		<location>Kampala, Uganda </location>
		<image>mapimages/african.jpg</image>
		<body>Merrick Posnansky is a specialist in African prehistory with interests in technology change, state formation and urban growth (Ghana and Togo), historical archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, African Diaspora, and cultural conservation and archaeological education in tropical Africa. He has published almost 200 monographs, articles, book chapters, and reviews and trained a generation of African and Africanist archaeologists. Posnansky's work in developing museums and academic programs in Kenya, Uganda, Ghana, and the United States marks him as one of the leading scholars in field. In 2006, he returned to Uganda, a region where he worked in the 1960s, to begin new archaeology and museum redevelopment projects. He continues to actively contribute to the intellectual life at the Cotsen Institute and abroad, including collaborating with <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/resources/visiting-scholars/cvs/cotsen-visiting-scholars/"><u>Dr. Ceri Ashley</u></a> , the 2006-2007 Cotsen Visiting Scholar.<br/><br/><a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/posnansky"><u>Merrick Posnansky</u></a> , Professor Emeritus of History and Anthropology 
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node19>
	<node20>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>European Paleolithic Archaeology</title>
		<location>Southwest France </location>
		<image>mapimages/europe.jpg</image>
		<body>James Sackett is an Old World prehistorian whose primary research interests include the French Paleolithic, archaeological method and theory, the history of archaeology, and style in material cultures. His major field research project was conducted at the open air site of Solvieux from 1967-1974 and was published in 1999 at UCLA. Sackett continues his research on the Solvieux materials and frequently returns to France. Additionally, Sackett is very active at the Cotsen Institute and can regularly be found giving lectures, serving on a number of key committees, and opening his active research lab to visiting researchers and the public. In 2004, James Sackett was awarded the Trowel, the highest honor of the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, for his contributions as a scholar, a former Director (1983-1984), and service as the Chair of the Executive Committee.<br/><br/><a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/sackett"><u>James Sackett</u></a>, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology 
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node20>
	<node21>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Community Formation in the El Morro Valley<br/>& the Puerco Ridge Survey</title>
		<location>Arizona/New Mexico border</location>
		<image>mapimages/schachner.jpg</image>
		<body>Greg Schachner is a North American archaeologist interested in the origins of villages and leadership in agricultural societies, settlement systems and analysis, ceramic analysis, and the social context of archaeological practice. His regional specialization is the Southwest, where he has worked in the Cibola, Mesa Verde, Hohokam, and Mimbres areas. He is currently working on <a href="http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/anthro/faculty/schachner/web/Home.html"><u>three research projects</u></a>: completing a book manuscript based upon his dissertation fieldwork in the El Morro Valley of New Mexico (A.D. 1200s); developing an archaeological project in the Puerco Ridge area in Arizona; and collaborating on a project to examine long-term changes in regional settlement patterns along the Zuni River. Schachner is also working with  <a href="://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/research-associates/clark"><u>Tiffany Clark</u></a>, a Southwest archaeologist and CIoA Research Associate, to organize the extensive collections from the PARP (Pajarito Archaeological Research Program, 1977-1981), a major field project directed by the late Professor James N. Hill.<br/><br/><a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/schachner"><u>Gregson Schachner</u></a>, Assistant Professor of Anthropology 
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node21>
	<node22>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Sisupalgarh Project </title>
		<location>E. India </location>
		<image>mapimages/sisupalgarh.jpg</image>
		<body>The Sisupalgarh Project is a multi-season archaeological research project at the ancient city of Sisupalgarh in eastern India. Occupied from approximately the third century BC to fourth century AD, this urban area was surrounded by dramatic walls early in its occupation. A fortified site of impressive proportions, the 130-hectare city had local, regional and long-distance ties with sites throughout the Indian subcontinent as documented archaeologically through the widespread distribution of ceramics, metal, and stone objects. Through a two-year program of systematic surface-survey, the distribution of these artifacts was correlated with evidence for manufacturing activities to assess the city's economic organization. Building from initial investigations by the Archaeological Survey of India, this project assesses the city from a whole-site perspective to evaluate whether there were different zones of activity, where the inhabitants of the city may have come from, and the relationships that they had with each other.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/smith"><u>Monica Smith</u></a>, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Interdepartmental Archaeology Graduate Program; R.K. Mohanty, Deccan College, Pune, India
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node22>
	<node23>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Programa Collasuyu</title>
		<location>Puno, Peru</location>
		<image>mapimages/puno.jpg</image>
		<body>The Programa Collasuyu is a multi-year research program of excavation, survey and analysis of archaeological materials in the Lake Titicaca Basin of Peru and Bolivia. The Programa is directed by Charles Stanish, an Andean archaeologist who has been working in the region for over 20 years. Presently, Stanish, his graduate students, and Peruvian colleagues are excavating and mapping a major settlement complex in the northern Titicaca Basin. This area, known as Taraco, housed a massive mound and pyramid complex from approximately 1400 B.C.E. to A.D. 900.  Excavations revealed adobe pyramids that were constructed in the first millennium A.D. along with earlier complex architecture from the first millennium B.C.E. Based on years of field research and travel, Stanish has recently completed a volume for the Cotsen Institute’s new <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/publications/browse-books/world-heritage-and-monument-series"><u><i>World Heritage and Monument Series</i></u></a>  on the Lake Titicaca Basin.<br/><br/><a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/stanish"><u>Charles Stanish</u></a>, Director of the Cotsen Institute and Professor of Anthropology
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node23>
	<node24>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Landscape Archaeology and Salt<br/>Production in the Sichuan Basin</title>
		<location>Chengdu, China </location>
		<image>mapimages/sichuan.jpg</image>
		<body>Since 1999, Lothar von Falkenhausen has served as the American co-PI of the ongoing UCLA-Peking University and Chengdu Institute of Archaeology Joint Project on Landscape Archaeology and Ancient Salt Production in the Sichuan Region. After several excavations of salt production sites, the project is now in its second phase as they undertake an archaeological survey in the ancient salt-producing area of central Sichuan province. The two previous seasons of fieldwork have resulted in the discovery of almost a hundred previously unknown sites, using a newly developed survey method adapted to the difficult conditions in an area covered with rice paddies. In addition to the long-term salt production project, Professor von Falkenhausen has published on ancient Chinese bronzes and their inscriptions, ritual, regional cultures, archaeological synthesis, ancient trans-Asiatic contacts, and methodological issues.<br/><br/><a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/vonfalkenhausen"><u>Lothar von Falkenhausen</u></a>, Associate Director of the Cotsen Institute and Professor of Art History
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node24>
	<node25>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Lofkënd Archaeological Project </title>
		<location>Albania, near Fier </location>
		<image>mapimages/lofkend.jpg</image>
		<body>The overall aim of <a href="http://ioa.ucla.edu/staff/papadopoulos/lofkend/index.html"><u>Lofkënd Archaeological Project</u></a>, which started in 2004, is to initiate protohistoric investigations in south-central Albania, specifically in the region focused around the tumulus of Lofkënd. The chronological range of the tumulus (Early Iron Age into the Bronze Age) offers a unique opportunity to explore the formative period immediately preceding the colonial foundations on the coast at Apollonia, Epidamnos-Dyrrachium and Butrint. Excavations and reconstruction of the tumulus were completed in 2007; artifact analyses are ongoing.<br/><br/>During the summer of 2008, undergraduate students participated in the Lofkënd Archaeological Project through the <a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/"><u>UCLA Archaeology Field Program</u></a>. As part of a regional analysis project in the Gjanica River valley, students participated in daily field-walking, collection and recording of artifacts, washing and classifying finds, as well as entering data from field notes, photographs and object registry. Students were trained in the use of GPS and learned to recognize, classify, and process artifacts and ecofacts. They were also introduced to the principles of conservation in the field lab and the interpretation of quantitative and qualitative data from the Paleolithic through Medieval-Modern periods.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/papadopoulos"><u>John Papadopoulos</u></a>, Professor and Chair of Classics at UCLA and Director of the Classics Laboratory at the Cotsen Institute; <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/morris"><u>Sarah Morris</u></a>, Steinmetz Professor of Classical Archaeology and Material Culture at UCLA; Lorenc Bejko, Director of the Albanian Rescue Archaeology Unit, International Center for Albanian Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, Tirana 
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node25>
	<node26>
		<logo>field</logo>
		<title>Museology Project with<br/>Archaeological Materials</title>
		<location>La Plata, Argentina </location>
		<image>mapimages/laplata.jpg</image>
		<body><a href="http://www.fcnym.unlp.edu.ar/museo/"><u>La Plata Natural History Museum</u></a>, founded over 150 years ago, is considered the most important natural history museum in Latin America.  Its archaeological collections are representative of a wide range of South American cultures. The Muñiz Barreto Collection serves as the core of the museum collection, with approximately 2,000 pieces.  The collection has expanded to include over 12,000 items, representing the best pieces in modern Argentinean archaeology.<br/><br/><a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/Argentina/overview.htm"><u>Students</u></a>  will have the opportunity to work on an ongoing research project on northwestern Argentinean archaeology with direct involvement in laboratory duties.  In addition to work with archaeological museum pieces, students will travel to northwest Argentina to visit the sites where objects were excavated from both funerary and habitation contexts. As part of their research work, students will learn how to manufacture pottery vessels and lithic instruments (ethnoarchaeology) in order to better understand how to identify diverse manufacturing techniques.<br/><br/>Director: Barbara Balesta, Research Associate with the Laboratory of Pottery Analysis at La Plata University and Director of the La Cienaga Archaeological Project at Catamarca Province, Northwest Argentina
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node26>
	<node27>
		<logo>field</logo>
		<title>Welqámex Archaeological Research Project </title>
		<location>Hope, British Columbia, Canada </location>
		<image>mapimages/welqamex.jpg</image>
		<body>Situated in the upper Fraser Valley of southern British Columbia, the <a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/Canada/overview.htm"><u>Welqámex Archaeological Project</u></a> offers oral, historical, and archaeological data to enhance the study of the eighteenth-century contact between politically complex indigenous communities and newly arrived Europeans. This region is rich in natural resources and was home to the Stó:lo (Coast Salish) peoples for thousands of years.<br/><br/>Students participate in ongoing household-level investigations at Welqámex, a large island village that featured several forms of residential architecture and was inhabited by at least one high-status slave-owning family. Fieldwork will include the excavation of an above-ground cedar plank house and small-scale subsurface testing in semi- subterranean pithouses (or sqémél). Students will also assist with surface survey, mapping, and testing at one or more additional upper Fraser Valley sites. While living in one of the most beautiful areas of southern British Columbia, students work with an international team of scholars, including members of the Chawathil First Nations community.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/research-associates/graesch"><u>Anthony P. Graesch</u></a>, Research Associate at the Cotsen Institute and Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center on the Everyday Lives Families (CELF); David Schaepe (Sto:lo Nation and UBC); members of the Chawathil First Nations. 
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node27>
	<node28>
		<logo>research</logo>
		<title>Tarapacá Valley<br/>Archaeological Field Project</title>
		<location>Iquique, Chile</location>
		<image>mapimages/tarapaca_field.jpg</image>
		<body>Beginning in 2005, the <a href="http://ioa.ucla.edu/staff/boytner/Tarapaca/"><u>Tarapacá Valley Archaeological Project (TVAP)</u></a> is a comprehensive research program that includes extensive survey, mapping, excavations, physical anthropology, rock art studies, conservation, and a range of other research activities in one of the driest regions of South America. Archaeological evidence suggests the valley was an important magnet for humans by 8000 BP and became and influential cult center by the 1st millennium AD. The TVAP is a multinational research project with its field headquarters at San Lorenzo de Tarapacá, about 100 kilometers northeast of Iquique. The final year of the field and conservation project was 2008, but artifact analyses and publication preparation are ongoing. <br/><br/>During the summers of 2006-2008, undergraduate students participated in the Tarapacá Valley Archaeological Field Project through the <a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/"><u>UCLA Archaeology Field Program</u></a> . They contributed to the ongoing research project through their participation on survey, excavations, and in the laboratory. In 2008, students also had the opportunity to attend a conservation field school, co-directed by Kakoulli and <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/research-associates/fischer"><U>Christian Fischer</U></a> . They learned the basic principles of archaeological conservation, including methods of non-invasive diagnostic investigations in the field and preventive and passive conservation approaches, completing 150 hours of supervised practical conservation work. <br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/staff/boytner"><u>Ran Boytner</u></a>, Director of International Research at the Cotsen Institute; Maria Cecilia Lozada, Adjunct Professor of Anthropology, University of Chicago; Ioanna Kakoulli, Assistant Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering at UCLA with joint appointment in the UCLA/Getty Archaeological and Ethnographic Conservation Program
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node28>
	<node29></node29>
	<node30>
		<logo>field</logo>
		<title>Pambamarca Archaeology Project </title>
		<location>Quito, Ecuador </location>
		<image>mapimages/pambamarca.jpg</image>
		<body>The <a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/Ecuador/overview.htm"><u>Pambamarca Archaeology Project</u></a> is investigating an impressive concentration of Pre-Columbian forts in the Northern Andes. The ancient fortresses of Pambamarca speak of a significant moment in Andean prehistory. Specifically, the expansion of the Inka Empire came to a standstill in this region when the Inkas encountered the resistant societies of Northern Ecuador that fought off the Inkas for over 15 years. Fieldwork focuses on the identity of these Ecuadorian societies and how the Inkas managed to finally overcome them. The focus of investigations include pre-Inka settlements, the design and construction of the fortresses themselves, and the road network that lead into and out of the region.<br/><br/>Students have the opportunity to work on all aspects of the <a href="http://www.pambamarca.net/"><u>research project</u></a>, including settlement survey, remote sensing, archaeological excavation, laboratory work, and community development activities. Additionally, students conduct independent research projects aimed at connecting the ancient remains with historic and living landscapes in order to construct a complete picture of life in and around Pambamarca.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/research-associates/connell"><u>Samuel V. Connell</u></a>, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Foothill College and Research Associate at the Cotsen Institute; Chad Gifford, Advising Dean at Columbia University; Maureen Carpenter; Ana Lucia Gonzalez, University of Hawaii at Manoa
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node30>
	<node31>
		<logo>field</logo>
		<title>Fayum Oasis Archaeological Project</title>
		<location>Fayum, Egypt </location>
		<image>mapimages/fayum.jpg</image>
		<body>The project, "Lake Shores, Land Use and the Development of Agriculture from Prehistory to Present", is located around Lake Qarun in the   <a href="http://www.archbase.com/fayum/"><u>Fayum Oasis</u></a> of Egypt’s Western Desert. The earliest evidence of agriculture in Egypt has been found along the ancient shorelines of the lake, which are now located in the Sahara Desert. Agriculture intensified during the Middle Kingdom (ca. 1975-1640 BCE) and the Greco-Roman period, starting in the third century BCE.<br/><br/><a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/Egypt/overview.htm"><u>The UCLA Field Program</u></a> will concentrate on the Greco-Roman town of Karanis and combines teaching American students with training Egyptian archaeologists employed by the Supreme Council of Antiquities, making cultural exchange an integral part of the program. During the five weeks students get an intensive on-the-job training in archaeological excavation techniques, survey and finds processing. Students have the opportunity to work closely with a wide range of archaeological specialists and learn about the site management and landscape preservation project at Karanis. Excursions to important sites in the vicinity and ethnoarchaeological assignments are also part of the training.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/wendrich"><u>Willeke Wendrich</u></a>, Associate Professor of Egyptian Archaeology at UCLA; René Cappers, Rijksuniversiteits Groningen, the Netherlands
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node31>
	<node32>
		<logo>field</logo>
		<title>Archaeology of the Early Kentish Church</title>
		<location>Kent, England</location>
		<image>mapimages/kent.jpg</image>
		<body>Kent, at the extreme southeastern tip of England, is perhaps best known internationally as the landing place of St. Augustine’s mission to convert the heathen Anglo-Saxons in 597 AD.  Within a generation of this formative moment in the annals of the Western Christianity, the Kentish royal house had sponsored the establishment of a network of monasteries within the borders of their kingdom. Surprisingly little is known of the physical appearance of these Anglo-Saxon monasteries and how they impacted the contemporary landscape. This new, innovative project aims to bring fresh archaeological evidence to bear on this fascinating subject through fieldwork and excavation.<br/><br/><a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/England/overview.htm"><u>Students</u></a>  have the opportunity to participate in open-area excavations beside the medieval parish church standing on the site of the Anglo-Saxon monastery of Lyminge, founded in 633 AD, and in survey work designed to establish the extent and character of contemporary settlement within the wider landscape. They will also benefit from two organized field trips to Christ Church Cathedral and the Roman shore forts of Richborough and Reculver.<br/><br/>Director: <a href="http://www.reading.ac.uk/archaeology/about/staff/gabor-thomas.asp"><u>Gabor Thomas</u></a>, Lecturer at the University of Reading, England
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node32>
	<node33>
		<logo>field</logo>
		<title>San Martino Archaeological Field School</title>
		<location>Torano di Borgorose, Italy</location>
		<image>mapimages/sanmartino.jpg</image>
		<body>The <a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/Italy/overview.htm"><u>field project</u></a> is centered at Torano di Borgorose, a small town approximately one hour northeast of Rome in the Cicolano region of Italy. The excavations focus on the area around the church of San Martino in Torano, where there is archaeological and/or documentary evidence of a pre-Roman sanctuary, a Roman-era villa, a medieval hospital, and the still-standing medieval church.<br/><br/>This program introduces undergraduate and graduate students to Classical archaeology, particularly the archaeology of Italy, through firsthand experience excavating at Torano di Borgorose. Students work with leading experts in Italian archaeology and gain an understanding of field excavation practices and the interpretation of archaeological remains. Field trips to major museums in Rome and other archaeological sites in Italy provide an overview of the material culture of pre-Roman and Roman Italy.  The experience of living near the excavation site also provides students with new insights into the connections between ancient and modern Italy.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/mcdonnell"><u>Kathryn J. McDonnell</u></a>, Assistant Professor of Classics at UCLA; Elizabeth Colantoni, Assistant Professor, University of Rochester 
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node33>
	<node34>
		<logo>field</logo>
		<title>Drago Archaeological Project</title>
		<location>Isla Colón, Panama </location>
		<image>mapimages/drago.jpg</image>
		<body><a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/Panama/overview.htm"><u>Sitio Drago</u></a> is a large site located on the Caribbean shore at Boca del Drago, on the northwest corner of Isla Colón in the Bocas del Toro archipelago. The local environment is hot, humid, and alive with all sorts of exotic tropical plants and animals – ashore, on the reefs, and in the mangroves. To date, Sitio Drago has yielded plentiful ceramic types and varieties, carved stone and shell, and evidence of plant food processing. Given the diverse array of artifacts, the project is focused on examining what the site can tell us about prehistoric social organization, trade, and external relations in the region and whether Sitio Drago represents a unique chiefly settlement.<br/><br/>Student will participate in survey, excavation and laboratory work and also visit well-defined local ecosystems that provided a variety of food and raw material resources for the past inhabitants of the site. Students are part of a team that excavates at Drago and cleans, catalogs, and analyzes materials recovered during excavation.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/staff/wake"><u>Thomas Wake</u></a>, Director of the Zooarchaeology Laboratory at the Cotsen Institute; Tomas Mendizabal, Archaeologist of the Direction of Historical Patrimony of the National Institute of Culture
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node34>
	<node35>
		<logo>field</logo>
		<title>Sacred Valley of the Incas</title>
		<location>Cuzco, Peru</location>
		<image>mapimages/inca.jpg</image>
		<body>The Sacred Valley of Cuzco was the heartland of the Inca Empire and continues to be a thriving city in the southern highlands of Peru. This unique   <a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/Peru/overview.htm"><u>travel-study program</u></a> introduces students to Andean prehistory, ethnohistory, anthropology through living and studying in this diverse and historically important region.<br/><br/>Activities for program students in and around Cuzco include: guest lectures by leading experts about Inca architecture, religion, agriculture; interactive demonstrations of traditional lifeways through music, cooking, weaving, attending local festivals, and learning the basics of Quechua; and study trips to relevant locations in and around Cuzco. Students will visit the Cuzco archive, study early chronicles, and compare early historic photographs to visible remains today. The project will conclude with a multi-day hike on the Inca Trail to visit the archaeological site of Machu Picchu with expert guides and archaeologists from the Peruvian National Institute of Culture.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/faculty/stanish"><u>Charles Stanish</u></a>, Director of the Cotsen Institute and Professor of Anthropology at UCLA; <a href="http://dralexeivranich.org/"><u>Alexei Vranich</u></a>, Research Associate in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node35>
	<node36>
		<logo>field</logo>
		<title>Pimu Island Archaeological Project </title>
		<location>Catalina Island, California </location>
		<image>mapimages/pimu.jpg</image>
		<body>The major goal of the <a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/Catalina/overview.htm"><u>Pimu Island Archaeological Project</u></a> is to study economic strategies and adaptations on the Channel Islands. Santa Catalina Island has been an important hub for the intermingling of people and the exchange of ideas and objects. Surrounded by rich marine and lithic resources, the Santa Catalina (Pimu) Island people were contributors to an extensive trade network throughout southern and central California and the Southwest.<br/><br/>Students conduct fieldwork in recent burn areas on the island that will allow for the characterization of the different types of archaeological sites (e.g. habitation, quarry, village, or ceremonial). Excavation will take place at a historic and prehistoric habitation site to record its attributes and to determine California Register eligibility.  Students have the opportunity to work with Gabrielino/Tongva tribal members and California archaeologists on an ongoing research project with direct involvement in excavation, survey, and laboratory duties. Lectures are given by local experts.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/research-associates/teeter"><u>Wendy Giddens Teeter</u></a>, Curator of Archaeology at the Fowler Museum at UCLA and Research Associate of the Cotsen Institute; Desireé Reneé Martinez, Harvard University; Douglas Comer, Cultural Site Research and Management, Inc; Tad Britt, Compass Systems, Inc. 
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node36>
	<node37>
		<logo>field</logo>
		<title>San Bernardino National Forest<br/>Applied Archaeology </title>
		<location>Big Bear Lake, CA </location>
		<image>mapimages/sbnf.jpg</image>
		<body>The <a href="http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/SanBernNatForest/overview.htm"><u>Applied Archaeology Field School</u></a>, located in the San Bernardino National Forest, is designed to train students for entry level jobs in Cultural Resource Management (CRM). The instructors are archaeologists with the  <a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/sanbernardino/about/fieldschool.shtml"><u>USDA Forest Service</u></a> , actively engaged in archaeology and cultural resource management on a daily basis. Students and staff camp in the San Bernardino Mountains approximately 10 miles north of the resort town of Big Bear Lake, California.<br/><br/>Through a combination of coursework and fieldwork, students will develop the necessary skills to conduct pedestrian surveys, to record prehistoric and historic archaeological sites, and to carry out scientific excavations. In the Holcomb Valley, a pedestrian survey will record prehistoric Serrano sites and historic mining sites and excavations will be conducted at Clapboard Town, one of three mining camps located in the valley. Local Serrano and Cahuilla tribal members participate in the educational experience, providing their own perspectives on Cultural Resource Management.<br/><br/>Co-directors: <a href="http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/people/research-associates/sapp"><u>William Sapp</u></a>, Research Associate at the Cotsen Institute & Forest Archaeologist, US Forest Service, San Bernardino National Forest; Daniel F. McCarthy, Tribal Relations Program Manager, US Forest Service, San Bernardino National Forest 
		</body>
		<links></links>
	</node37>	
</page>
 
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